You'll enjoy 'Lock In' if:

  • You are 14 or over.
  • You like sci-fi and social dystopias like 'Noughts and Crosses'.
  • You like a fast pace with plenty of dialogue.

In 'Lock In' a new virus has swept the planet leaving a portion of the population in a comatose state but with a fully operant consciousness. Thanks to technological investment, these Hadens can access society through human like robots called threeps. Some of these Hadens recover with the ability to allow other Hadens to use their bodies. These people are called integrators.

The book begins with a murder involving an integrator, and Chris Shane, a Haden detective living through a threep and new partner a former integrator called Vann set out to solve the crime.

What follows is combination of 'I, Robot' style speculative fiction and 'Maltese Falcon' style crime caper – two genres that I love. And I enjoyed the action scenes. I also liked the way the book tackled themes of ethnicity and of the marginalisation of minorities.

Later the plot did enough to keep me interested, but the book didn't do enough to get me enthralled. There was some sense of character, but I didn't really click with Scalzi's voices. With his heavy focus on dialogue (which I generally like, I didn't feel that the characters' individual voices were sufficiently differentiated, and the book, for me lacked a bit of texture.

I read another review of 'Lock In' that cites a 'Scooby Doo' ending and while I did enjoy the definite resolution, I do feel that this is a pretty astute observation.

Having finished the book,, I did enjoy it, but it's not one that I think a whole lot about. I may read more Scalzi. I may not.

I read this on kindle, and the formatting was pretty, but there were a lot of errors with the paragraphing. These don't bother me massively. But be warned if they're likely to bother you.

OWWF Rating: 6/10





You'll enjoy Leviathan Wakes if:

  • you are 12 or over.
  • you like space and stuff, or maybe Ender's Game.
  • you're a fan of P.I mysteries and tough cops.
  • you want to find a great series with the option to stop after one.

Okay so The Expanse is like the best thing I've seen on TV, like ever - well, alongside Stranger Things and People Just Do Nothing anyway. And so I figured since their isn't a second series yet, and I just wanted more, more, more, that I would read the book.

They call this series an epic space-opera, and I guess it's epic. That said, the cast list is pretty restricted, and the action rolls out in the space between Venus and Mars (okay maybe Saturn at a stretch). And I've got to say the term space-opera is pretty unappealing (too much like soap-opera, you know?).

Anyway the book is narrated from two alternating perspectives: Jim Holden, first Officer of the Canterbury, a Belt based ice miner, and Miller, a well weathered space-station detective, with a divorce and an attitude. Of the two perspectives I found the Miller chapters more compelling, but I think that the two narrative voices work well together, and that it's a bit unfair to compare Holden unfavourably as the tensions between Holden's innocence and Miller's experience make the book what it is.

As I read, I got about thirty pages in and I just thought - YES! This is what I've been looking to read. Just awesome! The voices and the atmosphere had me totally hooked. I'll admit that as I read on my enthusiasm waned a little. I did feel at times that Holden and Millers repeated successes against overwhelming odds, started to feel a little contrived and I found myself craving failure or even just a partial success, and having finished the book, I still feel that is a weakness.

If. like me, you come to Leviathan Wakes via the TV series, I think you'll be surprised by the extent that the story has been altered for TV. I love the TV series, but I really liked the way the story panned out here too. A lot more happens in this fist book than the TV series, and I think across the arc of this book the plot is excellently structured.

The ending of the book was effective, and not too hammy. It also felt like the close of a proper novel, as opposed to a first episode, so you won't be disappointed even if you decide not to read the whole series.

OWWF Rating: 8/10